New Zealand confirms plans to keep borders closed to tourists until early 2022

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New Zealand’s borders will remain closed to international visitors until at least April 2022 the country’s government has revealed – but there are exceptions for its citizens

New Zealand is keeping borders closed to tourists until April 2022 at the earliest

New Zealand ‘s borders will remain closed to international visitors until April 2022.

The country’s COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins announced this week that borders are currently planned to reopen from April 30, 2022 to international visitors who are fully vaccinated against Covid-19.

Even then, there will be strict entry requirements such as needing proof of vaccination, a pre-departure test, a signed passenger declaration, a seven-day self-isolation period, as well as testing on arrival and during self-isolation.

Vaccinated travellers won’t be required to stay in quarantine facilities, but they will be asked to self-isolate for seven days upon arrival.

Mr Hipkins said as part of a statement: ““We always said we’d open in a controlled way, and this started with halving the time spent in MIQ to seven days. Retaining a seven-day isolate at home period for fully vaccinated travellers is an important phase in the reconnecting strategy to provide continued safety assurance. These settings will continue to be reviewed against the risk posed by travellers entering New Zealand.”

For New Zealand’s citizens, the easing of border controls will start a little earlier in the year. Fully vaccinated New Zealand residents will be able to travel from Australia without quarantine in January, while in February they will be allowed to travel from other countries to New Zealand without quarantine.

According to the Foreign Office, Brits can only visit New Zealand if they “are considered to have a critical purpose to travel” – you can find out more in the travel advice here.







New Zealand’s breathtaking landscapes are off the cards for tourists until April 2022 at the earliest
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Image:

Getty Images)

The UK doesn’t have any countries on its red list at the time of writing, so if you are returning from New Zealand you won’t need to stay in a quarantine hotel. However, there are entry rules in place which depend on your vaccination status.

If you’re fully vaccinated, you’ll need to take a PCR test or lateral flow test on day two of your return. If you’re unvaccinated or partially vaccinated, you’ll need to take a pre-departure test, as well as PCR tests on days two and eight of your return. You’ll also be required to self-isolate for 10 days.

Where Brits can go on holiday

New Zealand has been one of the countries with some of the strictest border rules in place during the pandemic.

It’s not the only country to be taking a cautious approach to welcoming back visitors. Australia only recently began easing its border rules for travellers, and authorities recently announced that foreign visa holders can begin returning to the country from December such as international students, ‘working holiday makers’ and provisional family visa holders, would be able to once again visit the country.

Thailand was another country that took a phased reopening approach, initially only reopening certain hotspots such as Phuket to vaccinated tourists. However, the country has since reopened fully to vaccinated tourists from 63 countries, which includes the UK.

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